The search giant has regularly expressed a desire to help stem some of that negative impact, and now it’s putting its money where its mouth is to the tune of $1 billion. CEO Sundar Pichai announced Grow with Google External link opens in new window or tab at an event held in Pittsburgh, PA. Over the next five years, the initiative will commit $1 billion to nonprofits aimed at training American workers and helping build business.

The company is committing $10 million to Goodwill as part of the initiative — the largest Google.org has committed to one organization. That money will be used to help launch the Goodwill Digital Career Accelerator, aimed at preparing the American workforce for high-tech jobs. Grow with Google also will take the form of a national tour hosted by libraries and community organizations aimed at bringing training and career advice directly to local towns and cities. That’s part of the company’s goal of committing one million hours to employee volunteering over the next five years.

There's a new law on the books in California that will remove a barrier for low-income parents aiming to access education. Under a bill signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown on October 12, 2017, poor parents enrolled in English as a Second Language (ESL) or high school equivalency courses will be eligible for subsidized child care. (See full text of the bill online at: https://goo.gl/baZy8rExternal link opens in new window or tab.)

(Full URL is: https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201720180AB273 External link opens in new window or tab)

California has the highest share of adults with limited English proficiency and the lowest share of adults with a high school diploma, compared to other states, according to the California Budget and Policy Center External link opens in new window or tab. More than half of low-income children in the state – 1.6 million – have parents who have limited English proficiency and/or do not have a high school diploma.

Child care expenses can hold parents back, eating up over two-thirds of the income of the average single mother.

White House

The White House in September announced plans to spend $200 million a year on grants meant to boost STEM education in an effort to close a widening skills gap that, some say, has left Americans out of the running for scientific and technical jobs.

Bay Area powerhouses Facebook, Google and Salesforce have committed $50 million apiece to support these efforts–making up about half the $300 million commitment from the private sector. Other companies funding STEM education efforts include Amazon, General Motors and Lockheed Martin.

It was not immediately clear where the $200 million in federal dollars would come from, though the Trump administration emphasized that it would not be new funding, but rather existing money that would be redirected.