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Did you miss National College Transition Networks’s Building Integrated Education and Training Programs: Tested Strategies and New Endeavors External link opens in new window or tab NCTN and NELRC webinar series! Drawn from around the country, presenters described their local context and program design and discussed the impact of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA) on program choices. The archived recordings are now available.

Webinar #1: Implementing IET in Rural Settings

Rural settings present particular challenges for IET programs, such as a limited number of jobs in any one sector, transportation and childcare barriers, or inconsistent internet access. This webinar focuses on varied strategies that have shown promise in three rural states.

Webinar #2: IET within ESL Programs

English language learners arrive in this country with a wide range of educational backgrounds and work experience. IET programs can accelerate their access to decent jobs by building on that experience in training and job-focused language and math classes. This webinar highlights programs that are offering IET in culinary arts, building maintenance, and entrepreneurship.

Webinar #3: Contextualized Variations of I-BEST

I-BEST model pioneered in the state of Washington continues to inspire and inform states and programs across the US. The spirit of innovation is evident in the programs represented in this webinar through their customized approach to addressing the challenges of adult basic education students via team teaching, redesigned program structure, collaboration, and contextualized curricula.

Communicating at work

In the January 2017 Web-based activity article, Debbie Jensen writes that” Technical skills are only part of the education our students need to succeed in today’s job market. They also need soft skills. Lists of actual soft skills vary, but can include dependability, motivation, communication, creativity, problem solving, flexibility, teamwork, leadership, time management, collaboration, and conflict resolution. Lack of these skills cause problems once you are on the job. According to Business Week over 60 percent of managers agree soft skills are the most important when evaluating job performance. Mark Murphy, author of Hire for Attitude, said 46 percent of people who are newly hired fail in the first 18 months. Of those, 89 percent are fired because they lacked the soft skills needed for the workplace. The good news is soft skills can be taught and learned. “

Debbie Jensen goes on to provide a list of online resources to teach soft skills. Also provided is a practical listing of ways to use soft skills in our classrooms.

You can find step-by-step instructions and ideas for activities in the January Web-based Activity article .

Digital Promise Logo

If we believe in the potential of technology to bring quality digital learning opportunities to this underserved population, what can we do to accelerate adoption?

Authored by Patti Constantakis and in partnership with the Joyce Foundation, Mockingbird Education and SRI International, drawn from a study of digital learning technologies’ effectiveness in adult basic education, this paper explores four factors that contribute to effective implementation of technology.

The factors are:

  1. Support Multiple Implementation Models
  2. Use Data
  3. Support a Rich Technology Infrastructure
  4. Support the Evolving Role of the Instructor

Source: Digital Promise, Adult Learning External link opens in new window or tab

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Three Integrated EL Civics (English Literacy and Civics Education) conferences will be held in 2017. The first one serves the Central Valley and will convene on January 20th at the Bakersfield Adult School. The Southern California conference will be held on February 3rd at the Vista Adult School. The third conference serves Northern California and will be held at the Santa Clara Adult School. The link to the flyer for all three conferences is provided. OTAN handouts for presentations at all 3 events are available online External link opens in new window or tab .

The cost of the conference is $10, which includes registration and lunch.

Please go to the California Adult Student Assessment System (CASAS) at www.casas.org External link opens in new window or tab to register and pay for the conference. Early registration is recommended.

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Published in 2016, this report summarizes research findings about the conditions and practices that support positive outcomes of technology use for underserved, under-resourced, and underprepared students.

This literature review summarizes research findings about the conditions and practices that support positive outcomes of technology use for underserved, under-resourced, and underprepared K-12 students.

In regard to technology, the authors found that:

  1. Underserved students benefit from opportunities to learn that include one-to-one access to devices.
  2. High-speed Internet access is needed to prevent user issues when implementing digital learning.
  3. Underserved students benefit from technology interactions designed to promote high levels of interactivity and emphasize discovery.
  4. Successful digital learning environments are characterized by the right blend of teachers and technology.

With regard to the conditions and practices that support learning by underserved students, they found that:

  1. Underserved students benefit from learning activities that focus on the development of higher order thinking skills.
  2. Underserved students benefit from learning activities that draw on culture and community.
  3. Underserved students benefit from learning activities that provide them with opportunities to drive their own learning.

Source: LINCS Resource Collection External link opens in new window or tab

LINCS Logo

The LINCS Learning Portal has three Teacher Effectiveness courses. Each free, online course is self-paced and tailored to meet the needs of practitioners and programs, especially mentors and beginning teachers.



  • Introduction to Teacher Effectiveness and Induction is an overview of the Adult Education Teacher Competencies External link opens in new window or tab , an introduction to teacher induction, and a summary of the Adult Education Teacher Induction Toolkit External link opens in new window or tab and its resources.
  • Principles of Learning for Instructional Design course supports teachers’ understanding of the key principles underlying instructional design that promote learning and of strategies for applying those principles in their teaching. A completion certificate is available.
  • Motivating Adult Learners to Persist course supports teachers’ understanding of strategies that motivate adult learners to persist including using and inspiring learners’ interests, building learners’ self-efficacy, using incentives and motivation, providing choice and autonomy, and using digital media to promote persistence. A completion certificate is available.

Read more about all the resources External link opens in new window or tab developed by the Teacher Effectiveness federal initiative. Visit the Learning Portal External link opens in new window or tab to read about and sign up for courses available to you – anytime, anywhere. If you have not taken a course before, create a LINCS account to access the entire menu of courses.

Source: Literacy Information and Communication System, Teacher Effectiveness in Adult Education External link opens in new window or tab